Buzz Aldrin destroyed the idea that the U.S landing on the Moon had nothing to do with America and instead was a global accomplishment.

Here is what the star of the film Ryan Gosling claimed:

An upcoming movie depicting Neil Armstrong walking on the moon will not include the astronaut planting the American flag there.

Star Ryan Gosling, who plays Armstrong in the movie “First Man,” told The Telegraph this week that it’s because the first person to walk on the moon didn’t see himself “as an American hero.”

“I think this was widely regarded in the end as a human achievement [and] that’s how we chose to view it,” Gosling said. “I don’t think that Neil viewed himself as an American hero. From my interviews with his family and people that knew him, it was quite the opposite. And we wanted the film to reflect Neil.”

Neil Armstrong’s sons claimed that it wasn’t anti-American:

Although Neil didn’t see himself that way, he was an American hero. He was also an engineer and a pilot, a father and a friend, a man who suffered privately through great tragedies with incredible grace. This is why, though there are numerous shots of the American flag on the moon, the filmmakers chose to focus on Neil looking back at the earth, his walk to Little West Crater, his unique, personal experience of completing this journey, a journey that has seen so many incredible highs and devastating lows.

In short, we do not feel this movie is anti-American in the slightest. Quite the opposite. But don’t take our word for it. We’d encourage everyone to go see this remarkable film and see for themselves.”

The Hollywood Reporter also reported that the American Flag barely makes an appearance in the film.

It is unclear why the director, if not making a political statement would leave out the most memorable portion of the Moon Landing, the placing of the American Flag.

A research paper from 1992 proved this

“Even though the event took only 10 minutes of the 2 1/2 hour EVA, for many people around the world the flag-raising was one of the most memorable parts of the Apollo 11 lunar landing. There were no formal protests from other nations that the flag-raising constituted an illegal attempt to claim the moon. Buzz Aldrin, in an article written for Life magazine, stated that as he looked at the flag he sensed an “almost mystical unification of all people in the world at that moment.”

They also left out the fact that Buzz had communion while on the Moon. 

Watch Buzz and Neil place old glory on the moon:

 

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